October 17, 2011

7 Comments




 

Top Bar Hives, Warre Hives and Cedar Bee Hives

Our hives are built in Portland, Oregon from Western Red Cedar. In addition to beekeeping supplies, we also provide bee swarm removal, beekeeping classes, and hive consultations.

We've used the same cedar top bar hives and Warre hives we sell in our own apiary since 2008. Based on our testing and customer feedback, we've continued to refine the hives we build. We're proud to offer what we believe are the most innovative, well-made hives in the world.

When you buy hives and other beekeeping equipment from us, know that we're always available by phone, e-mail, or in person at our retail store to assist you. We keep bees ourselves and understand how to use each type of hive we sell. We want you to succeed as a beekeeper!

 


 


 

Difference Between Bumble Bees, Hornets, Wasps and Honey Bees

Each year we receive hundreds of calls from homeowners with "bees" that they'd like removed. Often they are, indeed, honey bees. At least 1/3 of the time, however, they are bumble bees, hornets, wasps or yellow jackets (a type of wasp). I'm not aware of any wasp/hornet removal services other than extermination. There are some who remove bumble bees, but usually I recommend to customers that they just leave them until winter, as they will die out.

Few people realize that there are upwards of 20,000 types of bees in the world, and more than 4,000 in North America alone. This doesn't even include hornets or wasps! Do note that all hornets are technically wasps...

Yesterday we received an e-mail from someone with what they thought was a bee's nest hanging from their eave. This should be the first indication that it is NOT honey bees, as they tend to live inside cavities as opposed to in exposed nests.

Here's a picture of the wasp/hornet's nest:

Wasp Nest

Yellow jackets are a type of wasp that often lives in the ground. This is the most common call we receive, and the first question I ask is, "Where is the nest?" If it's in the ground I assure them it's not honey bees, but likely yellow jackets! Yellow jackets, like bumble bees, die out over the winter in northern states. So if they are out of the way and not bothering you or your family, you can leave them alone until winter and then plug up the hole.

Bumble bees come in a tremendous array of shapes, sizes and colors. They usually live in the ground or in some other small cavity such as a bird house or mailbox. Most of the time they are very docile, with little interest in humans, though like any stinging insect they can be aggressive if provoked.

Here's an example of a sparrow house being used as a bumble bee nest:

Bumble Bee Nest

Honey bees prefer to live in elevated (as opposed to in the ground) cavities such as walls, chimneys or trees. They tend to be very docile even if you are standing directly in front of their hive.

If you've got some "bees" you'd like removed, please make sure that they aren't wasps/hornets or bumble bees. If they are honey bees we will do our best to help you out!


Matt Reed
Matt Reed

Author



7 Comments

DJ
DJ

August 16, 2014

A link to an artical on Wood Cutter Bees
http://www.galaxgazette.com/content/wood-cutter-bee

DJ
DJ

August 16, 2014

I am not an expert but this is what I have read.
The ground bee’s are most likely hornets. When provoked they sting and it can be painful and cause a reaction. Be careful. They normally have several entrants to the hive. The entrants can be as I have read 120ft apart.
The bee’s boring into the wood post is most likely Wood cutters, They are big with black and yellow stripes on them. For the most part they are harmless to you.

Jenn Smith
Jenn Smith

July 30, 2014

The “Carport” bees drilling into the wooden post are most likely Carpenter Bees. They have black shiny rear ends and a nice winter coat. They look similar to Bumble Bees. Leaving them alone is best – No bee will sting unless provoked. Swatting at a bee is provoking. Carpenter Bees seem to bore holes in untreated wood/lumber.
Honey Bees live in hives, trees, chimneys, walls… many many places. Ground Bees – simply live in the ground, Solitary bees live in holes less than 3/4 of an inch and last but not least Hornets, Wasps and Yellow Jackets are just jerks. There are many photos of all types of buzzing pollinators and other stinging flying insects online. The more you know, the more your brain grows. Enjoy!

Ron
Ron

July 14, 2014

Of these, can you tell me which “sting” and which “bite”?

John
John

July 09, 2014

My dog found a whole in the ground with bees inside of it not wasps. So I found out they are ground bees, which I have never heard of before. I would like to know what information you can share with me of in regards to ground bees. Thank you

Malcolm Peverley
Malcolm Peverley

July 02, 2014

Good advice Matt.

Tammy Smith
Tammy Smith

June 28, 2014

I have a carport that has wooden post holding it up with no garage doors. I seems we have some type of bee that is drilling into the wooden post. What kind of bee do you think this is?

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