October 19, 2016


Warre and top bar hives now available in sugar pine!


It’s illogical to harm the forests while on a quest to help bees. Until recently, the privilege of owning a sustainable pine hive at a moderate price was fiction. That’s why when we introduced our FSC Certified pine Langstroth hive, we saw a new boom of interest. Not only are beekeepers concerned about bees, they are interested in responsibly crafted hives made from ethically grown and forested lumber--resources that don’t harm the very land and vegetation the bees foster.

We are excited to announce that our Warre and Top Bar Hives are now available for pre-order in beautiful FSC-certified Sugar Pine. Pre-order today and receive 20% off top bar or Warre hives in either wood option! 

pine warre and top bar hives

 Not only does our Sugar Pine stay true to our core value of sustainability, but it is also a strong and handsome wood that makes excellent beehives for your yard or apiary. With small and infrequent knots, Sugar Pine is strong and offers great insulation for your bees.

Warre and Top Bar Hives offer numerous advantages for beekeepers. Mainly, neither of these hive models require extremely heavy lifting, making them much more accessible options for folks of all ages and abilities. The Top Bar Hive is extremely easy to manage and steward, though it needs more frequent inspections during spring and summer, and the Warre Hive was designed specifically for a certain philosophy of hands-off beekeeping developed by Abbe Emil Warre; a great hive if you travel a lot or like to let your bees be!

Warre top bars
The addition of sugar pine hives to our line of goods has brought numerous positive and exciting changes to our company. We’re experiencing fast expansion in a way we can be proud of. While we’re thrilled to be progressing and growing, our production mill is maxed with our swelling number of orders! We’re very busy bees keeping up with our workload and we want to be able to give each hive the care and attention it deserves. That’s why we’re offering Top Bar and Warre hives for pre-order (in either wood option). Place an order now to get yours in time for beekeeping season. The extra time will allow us to uphold our high quality standards and will give you some time to read up on beekeeping practices and plan for your new hives. After all, sometimes it’s nice having something to “pine” after.
October 11, 2016


Victory Garden of Tomorrow: Your Garden, Illustrated

Our newest line of products comes from a brand that proves home-grown foods will never go out of style. That brand is Victory Garden of Tomorrow (VGoT) and they are reviving a slice of history with their graphic yet classic collector’s items, including posters, screenprints, signs, patches, and more.

You may be wondering what a “victory garden” is referring to, so here is a quick history lesson: During World Wars I and II, Americans were encouraged to grow their own food in their backyards due to wartime food supplies being scarce. These gardens came to be called “victory gardens,” and were a way for all Americans to enjoy the bounty of their backyards while also feeling empowered by their noble and patriotic feat.

This history of empowerment by gardening is what first enticed VGoT’s founder, Joe Wirtheim, to re-imagine these sentiments in a modern context. Wirtheim also felt inspired by his upbringing near Dayton, Ohio with positive memories of tending to his family’s vegetable garden and gathering together around the dinner table each night. Wirtheim’s art is meant to inspire more slowness, more growth, and more appreciation for the earth amidst our busy 21st century lifestyles.

“Eating fresh food that we prepare will never go out of style.” -Joe Wirtheim


Wear, post, or hang VGoT artwork as a valiant testament to your love of clean food. We are proud to carry garden signs, calendars, and embroidered patches from Victory Garden of Tomorrow online and in our store.





July 26, 2016


Wedding Gift Ideas for Beekeepers and Bee-Lovers

Summer is a busy time for our bees, but also for love-birds tying the knot! Wedding season is in full swing, and you may find yourself heading to one wedding after another. Finding the perfect gift for the happy couple can be a challenge. However, whether they have green thumbs, their own backyard hives, or are lovers of honey and wax, we have wonderfully unique gift ideas that go above and beyond yet another toaster that they don’t actually need.

  • The Fresh Honey Cookbook

  • Written by chef and beekeeper, Laurey Masterton, this cookbook is full of new and innovative ways to use nutrient-rich honey in your next meal. Help the newlyweds avoid take-out every night of the week with some sweet meal-time inspiration. Examples of recipes included are: grilled honey pineapple, baby back ribs with sage honey, and strawberry-rhubarb ice cream. Yum!

  • Raw Honey

  • Either paired with a cookbook or as a stand-alone gift, a jar of raw honey is as tasteful as it is delicious (see what we did there?). What makes this such a special gift is its uniqueness: each jar of honey has its own signature taste, depending on the region and flower species that the bees collected nectar from. Truly one of a kind!

  • The Gardener’s Gift Set

  • The perfect combo pack for the couple with four green thumbs! This gift set is specially curated to help anyone’s garden bloom by attracting local pollinators to your garden and yard. Includes a pollinator seed pack, flower windmill, bear-shaped hummingbird feeder, cedar songbird house, and a copy of Attracting Native Pollinators from The Xerces Society.

  • Beeswax Candles

  • Did you know that beeswax candles actually purify the air while they burn? Our long-lasting beeswax candles are made from treatment-free wax and are a sophisticated way to decorate and brighten the newlyweds’ home. You can even mix and match a variety of shapes and heights to fit any room’s style.

  • Top Bar Hive Starter Kit

  • Beekeeping is an exciting hobby that does a lot of good for pollinators and plants alike. Our top bar hive, precision-milled from Western Red Cedar, is an excellent hive model for beginners as it requires no heavy lifting for inspections. Even better is that hive inspections can easily be a partner activity: One person can hold the comb while the other inspects it. Our starter kit has absolutely everything a first-timer needs to start their beekeeping adventure.

  • Bee Thinking Gift Certificate

  • Are you heading to a beekeeper’s wedding, but you’re unsure what’s already in their toolkit? Give them the gift of choice with a gift card! This way, they can easily shop online or stop into our store for a new hive tool, smoker, or honey harvesting system. Voila!

    There you have it: Five simple yet thoughtful gift ideas for the newlyweds in your life. Next time wedding bells start ringing, remember all the ways you can celebrate while also helping our critical pollinator populations!

    July 14, 2016


    July 07, 2016


    July 07, 2016


    Small Business Spotlight: Bread and Badger

    Here at Bee Thinking and Mead Market, we take pride in supporting fellow local small businesses. Both our Southeast Portland shop and online store are stocked with products made by local craftspeople, including gorgeous drinkware from Portland-based business Bread and Badger. We sat down with Amanda Siska, the creator of Bread and Badger, who does all her own designs and sandblasting. Stop into our shop or visit our website to pick up one of Amanda’s bee-adorned coffee mugs or wine glasses.

    Can you talk about how Bread and Badger got its start, and where your name comes from?

    I’d been selling shoes for a number of years before I decided I couldn’t take it anymore and I needed to draw full-time. I learned about glass etching in 2005 and I’ve been scratching surfaces ever since. Originally, I wanted to be a tattoo artist, but I found that glass engraving with a rotary tool was similar in technique, without the sterilization and possible regret.

    In 2008, demand for my hand-carved designs became too high to fill, so my husband, Sean, quit his day job to help me transition to sandblasting. We now sandblast all our glassware and ceramics in our Portland studio, using top-notch professional equipment.

    The name comes from the term "bread and butter," because this is our family's main source of income, but I chose the word "badger" because I was inspired by an article in National Geographic about honey badgers. Honey badgers are fearless creatures that will not back down from a fight, and are impervious to venom. They can kill animals many times their size and they eat bees and poisonous snakes. Quitting my job and starting my own business has been one of the hardest things I've ever done, and I am inspired by those tough little creatures every day, which can take on so much that other animals fear.

    We carry your coffee mugs and wine glasses etched with bees in our shop. What other products do you make?

    Anything that can be sandblasted, pretty much! We focus on drinking vessels, so we have an assortment of glass cups, barware, growlers, and ceramic mugs, which all feature my artwork. I like to draw happy things, so there are a lot of cute animals, and graphics that I think are symbolic of different interests (sugar skulls, knitting, constellations, trees, etc.).

    Where do you find inspiration for your original designs?

    I mostly look to nature these days, since I don't ever get enough of it in my busy life. I've been inspired by outer space, plants, and unusual animals. I'm also trying to think about icons that people in specific locations relate to, like the desert or the ocean.

    What techniques do you use to craft your products?

    We sandblast all our own products now, though I sometimes enjoy hand-engraving a very special piece for fun. We also carry some laser-engraved wooden items (magnets and holiday ornaments), and acid-etched brass pendants, which feature my artwork.

    Do you have any advice for someone thinking about starting their own small business?

    Do your research, find out if your idea is viable, and then jump right in! I think a lot of people overthink things too much at the beginning and never really get started. Also, you won't really know if you'll enjoy your business until you get into the thick of it, so just go for it. Everything is a learning experience.

    November 06, 2015


    Winterizing Your Bee Hive

    Preparing to winterize your hive can be a daunting task, even for an experienced beekeeper.

    If you’re working with Langstroth and Warre hives, you’ll want to remove surplus boxes that could potentially become dead space for cold air, robbing valuable heat from clustered bees during winter months. Also, if you’re using screened bottom boards, closing ventilation inserts will help to trap heat inside the hive. Bees expend an incredible amount of energy over the course of the winter to maintain a consistent 90-degree temperature inside of their clusters. Help them conserve as much energy as possible is crucial.

    At the same time, it is also important to create a way for any excessive moisture to leave your hive. Because bees generate heat with the beating of their wings, that heat will rise and form condensation when it mixes with the cold air at the top of the hive. While some condensation is important offering bees an important water source when they can’t leave the hive and offering insulation excess moisture can become a challenge for colonies who are already struggling. However, condensation tends to get a needlessly bad rap, but as Dr. Thomas Seeley has cited, bees in natural cavities have a warm, somewhat moist environment in the winter months.

    Moisture enters the hive a number of ways. Leaks in the hive roof, between rickety boxes or inadequate ventilation are potential issues to pay close attention to. When working with a Warre hive, ensure that your quilt box material is dry and lofted in order to allow for proper ventilation. If you have a Langstroth hive, you might want to consider propping the inner cover up slightly to allow for excess moisture to be released.

    If you live in the extreme north and feel there may be a need to add batting to the exterior of your Langstroth or Warre hive to fend off the encroaching cold, consider wrapping your hive with tar paper or a heavy construction paper. If you’re working with a top bar hive, consider filling cavity space with straw, hay, or even an old woolen blanket to create a thermal barrier. However, be careful of over insulting. Too much insulation could block the heat of the sun. An overly warm hive could also increase bee activity, which would then increase honey consumption. David Heaf points out that the minimal use of honey stores occurs at 41 degrees Fahrenheit. “Either side of this temperature honey consumption arises.” (Heaf 83)

    Having a wind barrier or wind break is also something to consider when preparing your beehives for a long winter. Bales of hay provide a nice natural way to limit the impact that icy winds can have on a hive. Be careful though! Michael Bush points out in his Practical Beekeeper series that hay bales are nothing more than “a mouse nest waiting to happen.” (Bush 421)

    With all hive types; helping bees protect their stores is crucial going as move into the colder months. Mice, wasps, and even other bees can be predators looking to invade your hive. Preventative measures like mouse guards and entrance reducers can help restrict larger predators from entering the hive, as well as allow your bees to mount a formidable defense by limiting critical pathways to honey stores. Additionally, ensuring that boxes with larger stores of honey are not at ground level is also another good way of helping bees defend what they worked so hard making all spring and summer.

    If you have been using a queen excluder during the spring and summer months, removing that tool is strongly encouraged during the winterizing process. Bees will migrate throughout the hive during the winter months as they continue to utilize honey stores. By removing the queen excluder, this ensures that the colony will not have to make the tough decision of following the food, or keeping the queen warm. Ultimately, it allows for more flexibility to let the bees do what they would naturally do.

    Some final best practices that beekeepers should consider are periodic visual inspections throughout the course of the fall and winter months. However, avoid upsetting the hive during the winter. Opening or disturbing the hive could put a significant amount of stress on the colony, causing bees to rapidly deplete their food stores in a way they might not otherwise. A beekeeper may want to invest in a stethoscope to listen to your bees without disturbing the hive. Also, keep an eye out for signs that predators have been trying to access the hive. Lastly, pay attention to the hive entrance and make sure that the front door is not blocked by dead bees or debris, restricting access to vitally important airflow.

    August 13, 2015


    The Mysterious Bee Escape

    Few of our beekeeping supplies can seem as perplexing to new beekeepers as the 8-way bee escape. On its own, the yellow plastic bee escape hardly looks intuitive (is it a hummingbird feeder? A water trough? A Frisbee?). Once mounted to a Langstroth inner cover or other exit board, however, the bee escape board becomes a beautifully simple honey-harvesting tool.

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    August 04, 2015


    Checking Hives with the Rauchboy Smoker

    As busy beekeeping equipment suppliers and hive builders, own beekeeping adventures often happen in the early hours. With the morning sun soaring upwards, two of our staff beekeepers and I packed coffee and breakfast out to our apiary. We wanted to check up on a few hives, and we used the opportunity to field test our new Rauchboy Smokers. The smokers recently arrived from Germany, and we're excited to become one of the only US retailers to offer the Rauchboy. 

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    July 13, 2015


    Vineyard and Apiary: Part II

    For part II of our visit with Dundee Hill wineries, I visited Winderlea Winery and Vineyard. Winderlea stretches 20 acres across a stunning hillside and produces around 5000 cases of wine per year. The vineyard has employed Biodynamic agriculture practices since 2009 and is currently working on becoming Biodynamic certified. They have been a certified B corporation since early 2015.

    Owner, winemaker, and Warré beekeeper Bill Sweat joined us to discuss the role honeybees play in his vineyard ecosystem and show us his hive.

    Winderlea bee thinking blog front sign

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